Abstract:

M. Le Petit, who is at present in Nairobi, was for a period of five years travelling in the French Congo, and he has kindly furnished me with a somewhat detailed account of the Water-Elephant

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Abstract:

Early in October this year (1952) I had my first chance after forty years in East Africa of observing wild elephants at very close quarters. My son, who has a roving job in South Masailand, met me in Arusha to take me into camp for one night. His battered safari truck was ready loaded with an equally battered minimum of camp kit. We scorched along the fine Stirling Astaldi tarmac road at a speed which terrified me in view of the vehicle's condition.

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Author:

Choudhury, A

Abstract:

The Cachar and North Cachar hills districts of southern Assam once held large populations of wild elephants. However, habitat destruction and poaching has made them locally extinct in many areas. Though a very good elephant population still exists in Assam, in these two arcas their status is vulnerable.

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Author:

Khalil, M

Abstract:

Since Cobbold's admirable work on the parasites of the Indian elephant in 1882, our knowledge of the Helminths harboured by this species of elephant has been considerably enlarged by Lieut.-Col. C. Lane, Railliet & Henry, and others. Little advance has been made regarding the parasites of the African elephant. The new species recorded here, with one exception, are parasites of the latter animal.

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Abstract:

We collected data on Asiatic Elephant Elephas maximus ranging and habitat selection in Rajaji National Park (RNP) in Uttarakhand state, India using radio telemetry from December 1996 - March 1998. Elephant home ranges were estimated (using 100 Minimum Convex Polygon) to range from 188 sq. km to > 400 sq. km. We could not detect any difference between male and female home ranges.

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Abstract:

The Minneriya National Park was established mainly to enhance the long-term survival of the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) in a predominantly agricultural area in Sri Lanka. The ancient reservoir, after which the Park is named, is seasonally home to large numbers of elephants because of the availability of water and the extensive areas of grassland created by fluctuations in the water level.

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